The Devil’s Bible (Bohemian Gospel #2) by Dana Chamblee Carpenter

The Codex Gigas, also known as The Devil’s Bible, is an ancient book shrouded in mystery. Once considered one of the wonders of the world, the truth behind who wrote it and where has been lost to time. Yet there are those who continue to whisper about the strange book – about how it calls to the power-hungry and eventually drives them mad.

There is no one alive who knows the truth – no one except Mouse.

Going by the name Emma Nicholas, Mouse has been running from the truth behind the Devil’s Bible for centuries. Using a normal name and trying to live a normal life, Mouse only wants the one thing she can never have. Yet her life of a lie has caught up with her and when she finds herself facing exposure, Mouse has little choice to run.

Believing herself beyond help, a stranger’s kind act gives Mouse the first glimmer of hope she has felt in years. This flicker will need to be fanned to a full force flame however if Mouse wants to win this game of souls that began a very, very long time ago.

The Devil’s Bible is a real book, and like it is portrayed in this book with the same name, it is shrouded in mystery. No one truly knows the truth behind this book – who wrote it and where – though many theories abound. Chamblee-Carpenter offers one version, mixing reality and fantasy in this edge of your seat story.

I really enjoyed reading The Devil’s Bible. It wasn’t until I was adding this book to my Goodreads queue that I realized it is the second book in a series. Fortunately, one does not have to read the first book to enjoy the second. The first book seems to be solely about Mouse’s early life up to the point where she penned the Devil’s Bible. The second book is more modern day and touches briefly on Mouse’s past enough that the reader is able to follow along.

There are some who might compare The Devil’s Bible with The DaVinci Code with its combination of speculation and truth. And while there are some similarities, I enjoyed The Devil’s Bible more. While rich in religious imagery, it also doesn’t bash you over the head with it.

The one drawback I found was what was supposed to be the “final” battle between Mouse and her father. Looking back I can see why it was written that way as it left things open for a sequel. However, as I was in the process of reading the book, I felt let down. Like so many things, the ending makes sense in hindsight.

On the whole, I greatly enjoyed The Devil’s Bible. There are numerous people on Goodreads who say you should read the first book, The Bohemian Gospel, first; yet there are just as many who were like me and read the second book without reading the first and liking it just as much. Whichever way you decide to tackle this tome, I recommend it to all of my readers.

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