Go by Kazuki Kaneshiro (translated by Takami Nieda)

For two teens, falling in love is going to make a world of difference in this beautifully translated, bold, and endearing novel about love, loss, and the pain of racial discrimination.

As a Korean student in a Japanese high school, Sugihara has had to defend himself against all kinds of bullies. But nothing could have prepared him for the heartache he feels when he falls hopelessly in love with a Japanese girl named Sakurai. Immersed in their shared love for classical music and foreign movies, the two gradually grow closer and closer.

One night, after being hit by personal tragedy, Sugihara reveals to Sakurai that he is not Japanese—as his name might indicate.

Torn between a chance at self-discovery that he’s ready to seize and the prejudices of others that he can’t control, Sugihara must decide who he wants to be and where he wants to go next. Will Sakurai be able to confront her own bias and accompany him on his journey?

Go by Kazuki Kaneshiro is one of those books where expectation and reality don’t quite meet. This is not always a bad thing, because while the premise of Go points to romance, the book itself is actually much more.

Though the story centers on the blossoming romance between Sukihara and Sagurai, it is only one of the many layers that make up the entirety. The book is also about coming to terms with oneself and with society, for good and for bad. It is about realization, about understanding that just because the world says we should be one way because of the way we look or because of our background, it is not the only option. And while breaking free of a preconceived mold might be difficult, it can be done.

There is some violence and not all of the characters are very nice, but I think that just adds to the realism of the story. The fact that even the main characters, Sugihara and Sagurai, are flawed makes everything more believable.

Go is one of those books that I could easily see being taught to upper level high school students. As many of the characters are of the high school age, it would be easy to relate to them. That does not mean that adults cannot enjoy this book, because I certainly did.

Overall, I recommend Go by Kazuki Kaneshiro. Not only does it give a glimpse in to a foreign society – literally and figuratively – it also holds up a mirror to our own.

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