Provided for Review: The Devil’s Apprentice (The Great Devil War #1) by Kenneth B. Andersen

Philip is a good boy, a really good boy, who accidentally gets sent to Hell to become the Devil’s heir. The Devil, Lucifer, is dying and desperately in need of a successor, but there’s been a mistake and Philip is the wrong boy. Philip is terrible at being bad, but Lucifer has no other choice than to begin the difficult task of training him in the ways of evil. Philip gets both friends and enemies in this odd, gloomy underworld—but who can he trust, when he discovers an evil-minded plot against the dark throne?

This book was provided for review by the author and The Write Reads. Thank you!

In recent years YA fantasy has apparently found a larger audience and books in the category have come out by the score. And while this is certainly a good thing, sadly many of the books sound and read the same.

The Devil’s Apprentice by Kenneth Andersen however is not one of them.

Set in a universe that could easily be ours, the story follows what happens when a very good boy mistakenly ends up in a very bad place. Philip is the poster boy for being good; I’m fairly sure other parents point to him and ask their children ‘Why can’t you be more like Philip?’ He is something of an oddity both in the living world and in Hell. It is that good nature though that ends up helping him and the Devil as well.

Andersen’s version of Hell is a combination of familiar and new. There are tortured souls and demons aplenty but there are also demon families, a demon school that young demons attend. There is a town with shops and homes and other familiar things albeit with a slightly sinister twist. It is a unique version of the realm.

The characters in the book are also an interesting bunch. Not just the humans like Phillip, but the numerous demons that make up the denizens of Hell. Andersen obviously references Dante’s inferno with the demons yet also adds his own ideas in to the mix.

I really enjoyed reading The Devil’s Apprentice. I found it to be more than just a simple story of a misunderstanding gone wrong. It is nuanced and layered in a way that few YA books are. And while it might be marketed at younger readers, I could easily see older readers enjoying it as well. Major kudos to Mr. Andersen, I look forward to reading the rest of the series!

Provided for Review: 29 Seconds by T.M. Logan

“Give me one name. One person. And I will make them disappear.”

Sarah is a young professor struggling to prove herself in a workplace controlled by the charming and manipulative Alan Hawthorne, a renowned scholar and television host. The beloved professor rakes in million-dollar grants for the university where Sarah works—so his inappropriate treatment of female colleagues behind closed doors has gone unchallenged for years. And Sarah is his newest target.

When Hawthorne’s advances become threatening, she’s left with nowhere to turn. Until the night she witnesses an attempted kidnapping of a young child on her drive home, and impulsively jumps in to intervene. The child’s father turns out to be a successful businessman with dangerous connections—and her act of bravery has put this powerful man in her debt. He lives by his own brutal code, and all debts must be repaid. In the only way he knows how. The man gives Sarah a burner phone and an unbelievable offer. A once-in-a-lifetime deal that can make all her problems disappear.

No consequences. No traces. No chance of being found out. All it takes is a 29-second phone call.

Because everyone has a name to give. Don’t they?

This book was provided for review by NetGalley. Thank you!

29 Seconds is the newest thriller by T.M. Logan and oh my goodness dear reader it is one heck of a roller coaster ride. It is one of those books that grabs you by hand with the opening paragraphs and does not let go until the final pages. If it weren’t for mundane things like work, eating, and sleeping, I could have easily finished the book in a day. I finished it in two.

29 Seconds is centered on a subject that I believe every individual can relate to – harassment. Sexual or not, whether in the workplace or not, everyone has been harassed by another person in their life at one time or another.

For Sarah, her harasser is her boss. A tenured professor and TV host, he is loved by countless audience members, but behind that slick smile and professional demeanor lies a cruel and calculating individual. Hawthorne has been playing the harassment game for a long time and knows just what to say and do. When Sarah realizes that the school faculty know about Hawthorne’s ways but won’t do anything about it, she finds herself left with two options – say nothing and suffer or stand up and fight.

Logan’s writing in regards to this sensitive subject and in regards to the book as a whole is top notch. His style and pacing not only keep the story moving during the high action scenes but during the lower action, more personal scenes as well. His characters are easy to empathize with even if we might not agree with how they handle certain situations.

29 Seconds is not for everyone! Those who are triggered by sexual harassment or even harassment in general would do well to stay away. Readers who love a good, edge of your seat thriller, however might want to give this book a try. Because at the end, you too might find yourself asking, If I had the opportunity to make someone disappear, would I?